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Airman 1st Class Scott Hooper, 2nd Maintenance Squadron Accessories Flight fuels maintenance section, removes the mid-body section panel to gain access to a fuel tank of a B-52H Stratofortress on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Oct. 16. Airmen in the fuels section have the responsibility of diagnosing and repairing the various fuel systems and fuel tanks on the B-52 to ensure the aircraft completes its mission of delivering precision munitions on the battlefield. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Andrew Moua)(RELEASED) Fuel Cell Airmen: Confined spaces braved and leaking lines saved
The long range and versatility of the B-52 make it the weapon of choice for providing deterrence, demonstrating U.S. resolve and combat operations around the world, but the jet could never leave the runway without a working fuel system.Taking care of that responsibility for team Barksdale is, the 2nd Maintenance Squadron Accessories Flight Fuels
0 10/22
2012
Staff Sgt. Joshua Crowe, 20th Aircraft Maintenance Unit hydraulics section, replaces a banana link on the main landing gear of a B-52H Stratofortress on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Oct. 10. The flightline section of the hydraulics shop handles a much different sort of maintenance, such as red-ball, situations that occur during aircraft take-off that require immediate maintenance. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Andrew Moua)(RELEASED) Hydraulics steer the BUFF in the right direction
Pumps, pistons, brakes and actuators are the backbone of hydraulics, a science that allows Barksdale's B-52H Stratofortresses to maneuver through battle space and deliver bombs on target.To accomplish this mission, the 2nd Maintenance Squadron Accessories Flight Hydraulics Section has the responsibility of maintaining and repairing brake systems
0 10/12
2012
Airman 1st Class Mikel Stevens, 2nd Maintenance Squadron accessories flight electrical and environmental section, installs a valley panel on a B-52H Stratofortress on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Oct. 4. Valley panels cover critical parts of the engine, this area contains the anti-icing units which prevent the engines from seizing up at high altitudes. Installation and repair to vital areas such as these are one of the areas of expertise E and E Airmen must obtain to ensure the Barksdale mission runs successfully. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Andrew Moua)(RELEASED) Electrical and Environmental systems breathe life into the B-52
The 2nd Maintenance Squadron accessories flight electrical and environmental section maintains and repairs power systems and replenishes aircrew life support gear, ensuring the aircraft's nervous system continues to function properly.The electrical systems inside aircraft can be compared to the nervous system inside the human body, with wiring
0 10/05
2012
Tech. Sgt. Robert Lefors and Staff Sgt. Michael Dickerson, 2nd Maintenance Group Quality Assurance Office, inspect a B-52H Stratofortress rudder on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Oct. 2. Due to cracks found during a phase inspection, Airmen from the 2nd Maintenance Squadron removed and replaced the B-52s rudder. The B-52 provides the backbone of the bomber force with the ability for global attack and precision engagement. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Micaiah Anthony)(RELEASED)
Fold, Fix and Fly
In order for an aircraft to roll, pitch and yaw it needs three primary components: a spoiler, elevator and a rudder. Recently however, it was discovered one of Team Barksdale's B-52H Stratofortess bombers needed a new rudder. Most parts or components are changed out regularly due to constant wear and tear but the last time a rudder was changed at
0 10/05
2012
Staff Sgt. Michael Plummer, 2nd Maintenance Squadron communication and navigation mission systems shift supervisor, shows Airman 1st Class Christopher Shelby, 2 MXS COMNAV journeyman, a corroded interphone wire inside a B-52H Stratofortress on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Sept. 25. Aircrews use the interphones to communicate with each other in the aircraft. Every 450 hours, avionics Airmen inspect the B-52 to ensure its avionics systems are working and free of corrosion. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Micaiah Anthony)(RELEASED) Avionics: the nervous system of the BUFF
Due to advances in technology, some aircraft in the U.S. inventory can trouble shoot their own avionics systems; however, for the B-52H Stratofortress, the aircraft's systems must be monitored and manually maintained frequently.Avionics Airmen from the 2nd Maintenance Group are the guardians who monitor the B-52's avionics systems. These Airmen
0 9/28
2012
Senior Airman Miguel Reed, 2nd Communications Squadron Infrastructure Flight, uses a lineman's handset, more commonly known as a butt-set, on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Sept. 25. Infrastructure flight Airmen use these handsets to test phone lines to monitor if they are functioning correctly and perform the proper maintenance should they find a faulty line. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Andrew Moua)(RELEASED)
Worldwide communication
Barksdale Airmen are connected to one another, whether it's through the Internet or phones, and the 2nd Communications Squadron Infrastructure Flight ensures Team Barksdale members receives mission critical information. "We handle all communications on base and ensure we're connected to the outside world," said Senior Airman Miguel Reed, 2 CS
0 9/28
2012
Tech. Sergeant Jeremy Gavidia, 2 BW Safety Office NCO in charge of ground safety, obtains information via phone to file a mishap report on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Sept. 19. The Safety Office gives advice and information for commanders to use to ensure safe procedures are followed to reduce the amount of accidents throughout the base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Andrew Moua)(RELEASED) Play hard, Play Safe
All Airmen are familiar with safety briefings and safety days, the most recent being the Street Smart presentation given before the Labor Day weekend, little do Airmen know there is much more to these briefings than meets the eye.The 2nd Bomb Wing Safety Office aims to prevent fatal accidents and help ensure Team Barksdale members make safe choices
0 9/20
2012
Senior Airman Derek McLemore, 2nd Logistics Readiness Squadron facilities maintainer, ensures biodiesel is being properly distributed into a fuel station on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Sept. 18. McLemore goes through a checklist of tasks that need to be done while fuel is being distributed into the base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Benjamin Gonsier)(RELEASED)
POL Airmen keep Barksdale moving
Just as people need food and water to function, aircraft and vehicles need fuel to perform their mission.Airmen from the 2nd Logistics Readiness Squadron Fuels Management Flight are responsible for the petroleum, oil and lubricant needed to get aircraft off the ground and vehicles on the road."Our mission statement is to enable flexible and
0 9/20
2012
Airman 1st Class Creston Jenkins, top, and Senior Airman David Montroy both members of the 2nd Communications Squadron, scale an antenna tower on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Sept. 18. The Cable Dawgs Airmen climbed the tower to inspect the tower's antennas. Every six months the antennas are inspected to ensure the wires connected to the antennas do not have any corrosion or damage. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Micaiah Anthony)(RELEASED) Cable Dawgs run in packs to get job done
From scaling 150-foot towers, to exploring dark utility holes, Cable Dawgs work hard to keep Team Barksdale's $116 million cable and fiber infrastructure wrapped up. Airmen from the 2nd Communications Squadron repair or install cables, antennas, phone and fiber optic lines to ensure Team Barksdale can communicate effectively and securely. "Our job
0 9/20
2012
Airman 1st Class Ben Jordan, 2nd Maintenance Operations Squadron assistant time compliance technical order monitor, reviews a TCTO on Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Sept. 6. A TCTO is a request for a major modification on either an aircraft or piece of equipment that needs to be completed within a designated amount of time. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Benjamin Gonsier)(RELEASED) Just in time
In order to keep aircraft safe and on the leading edge of combat capability, they constantly undergo upgrades and maintenance.Sometimes this maintenance is time sensitive or critical and must be completed by a specific date. In this case, a specific action known as a Time Compliance Technical Order is initiated to ensure the required maintenance is
0 9/12
2012
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